How Did I Get This Pain?

September 17, 2016

 

 

 

 


Do you suffer from a repetitive strain injury? Many of you will know someone that has Thoracic outlet syndrome or carpel tunnel syndrome. These are often caused from repetitive movements in our lives from our jobs or even from our extracitulative activities. This can even be caused from poor posture. SO now that you have it or know someone that suffers from this lets take a look to see what this all looks like in the tissues of our bodies.

 

 

There is a few places along the travel path of the nerves that things can become pinched hence creating these discomforts and pains in our bodies. The nerves being the brachial plexus, radial nerve and the ulnar nerves leaves our main nervous system and leaves via the neck to come down into our shoulders traveling into and around many muscles making their way through our arms. 
 

 

As these nerves travels their paths through the shoulder joint, this is the second place that it can become compressed from our daily movements to create injuries by putting pressure at the area of glenohumeral joint. Problems in this area generally are referred to as Rotator Cuff injuries. There is 8 muscles that build and support together that make up the rotator cuff. The complication in this area also can involve the clavicle and first rib. Lets also add in that the connective tissues that help to make up and support the joint can play into our pain sensations and how our shoulders move.

The nerve travels down amoungst our deltoids, biceps into our elbow. Where the ulna nerve has a chance to become compressed from tissues and bones. The compression in this area is often known as tennis elbow aka tendinitis.

 


The next juncture of many paths that cross would be the carpels in the wrist, this is where we have 8 bones of the carpels and 9. Tendons connected to the muscles and 2 nerve roots of the ulnar and median nerves all run amongst the bones. This area is where carpel tunnel is well known. 

Now that we have shared some of the basic anatomy and terms let's look to see how massage can help with these conditions. Not only will you hear my thoughts of how my work helps my clients we will see what a client says to give a better visual of these conditions. 

Massage helps to lengthen and stretch the fibers of your muscles. We use varied approaches from one therapist to another. The education of each therapist builds to their knowledge and approach. Here at Laurel Tree Massage we are starting to build on our specific education in working towards helping our clients improve specifically by taking classes with well known educators in ortho massage and structural relief therapy.  We work not just the muscles but also working with the soft tissues surrounding and within the joints. Relieving the sensations of tight muscles and sometimes even the pinching of nerves by relieving inflamed tissues.

 

Andrea states: I am very bless to have found Laura as my massage therapist! I began seeing her for a strained wrist and after ONE visit the pain was gone.  I no longer need to wear a wrist brace or anti-inflammatory drugs! Myself being in the medical field, I have long days of standing while doing repetitive movements with not a lot of time to stretch.  I value my time with Laura as a way to let go of the tension and chit chatting or just relaxing in the quite.  After 6 years I am still privileged to massages with Laura and am very grateful! Thank you Laura! ~Andrea

 

With working with the entire structural system of our soft tissues (yes muscles are included in this) we strive to improve not only the sensation of how things feel in your body but also working with all variables to help improve the structural aspect by softening muscles, taking pressure off nerves and helping the muscles to hold the bones in the place that they are meant to be in. Many times finding the natural resting place for these tissues.
 

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